David, who is a teacher, decided to fundraise for Child Bereavement UK after the father of one of his students died from Covid-19.

A few days after the London Marathon was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic, I heard that a student in my year group had lost his father to Covid-19.  It really hit me emotionally and I felt compelled to do something for a charity that supports young people affected in this way.  Then I remembered watching the BBC documentary on Rio and Kate Ferdinand, in which they spoke to bereaved children at Child Bereavement UK.

I heard that a student in my year group had lost his father to Covid-19. It really hit me emotionally and I felt compelled to do something for a charity that supports young people affected in this way. 

I decided to do the Marathon Circuit Challenge to fundraise for the charity, completing 26 rounds of a 26 press ups, 26 sit ups and mile runs. repeating this circuit 26 times. I finished by doing 26 burpees and running a final 0.2 miles, to make up the distance covered in the London Marathon.

The whole thing took me 6 hrs 16 mins 35 second. I was very tired, very sore and sun burnt.  However, despite challenges such as hamstring cramp, crippling abdominal cramps, general muscle pains and trying to maintain hydration, I pushed through, even though my body wanted me to stop.

I felt immense satisfaction at being able to meet the challenge, as well as a huge sense of happiness that so many people had supported me through the challenge with donations, kind words and messages of support. I had been anxious in the days before the challenge that perhaps people wouldn't be as interested in the challenge as I had initially hoped, so to hear the donations coming in throughout the day was a real boost and made the last few hours more manageable.

If anyone else is thinking of doing a similar challenge, I would say just do it, just commit! I was unsure of myself a week or two before, because we humans prefer to let self-doubt and "what if?" worries dominate our thoughts, but you've just got to commit to the positive side and realise just how much good you can do for other people.

I know full well that, had I bailed out of mine, I would have sat there on 'Marathon Sunday' and hated myself for backing out for no good reason. 

I thought "Would I rather go through this discomfort than suffer the pain of losing a parent or a sibling"? The answer was so obvious, so that's what I kept at the front of my mind in the days before and while I was hurting on the challenge. 

I watch and read a lot of sports movies, documentaries and self-made successful people’s autobiographies, and the overwhelming common theme is that any ordinary person can do extraordinary things.  It serves no one to stay in your comfort zone, but it can serve many people to play to your strengths. I felt I had the time, space and physical capacity to do some good for other people, and therefore had the responsibility to do it for them also. It's wonderful that the challenge was well-supported, and that the money raised will help such a worthy cause.

I felt I had the time, space and physical capacity to do some good for other people, and therefore had the responsibility to do it for them also. It's wonderful that the challenge was well-supported, and that the money raised will help such a worthy cause.