When Danielle was 23, her brother died suddenly. Her mother died when she was thirteen; at that time she had received no bereavement support.

Volunteering showed me the positive impact of bringing groups of bereaved young people together in a safe place. The teenagers often couldn’t express their grief at home or at school, but they were able to do so in the sessions.

After my brother died, I decided to volunteer for the charity. I was given time off work every week to help with the Group for Young People in Buckinghamshire. Volunteering showed me the positive impact of bringing groups of bereaved young people together in a safe place. The teenagers often couldn’t express their grief at home or at school, but they were able to do so in the sessions. This helped me to process the grief I was experiencing personally and had been experiencing right the way through my teens. I had always been able to mask my grief and appear strong, so it was reassuring to know that I was not alone.

Sadly, I could not continue volunteering due to work commitments. So instead I began to fundraise by taking on challenges, planning events such as fun runs, cake sales and raffles, and by doing bucket collections at major public events.

I also saw the impact of Child Bereavement UK through my friend, who is a primary school teacher, when one of her pupils lost their mother. My friend was not only grieving herself, as she got to know the parents of her students well, but she also had to cope with bereavement within her class room of Year One students. Child Bereavement UK provided resources and classroom ideas, enabling my friend to manage the distressing situation in a positive way.

I ran the London Marathon for Child Bereavement UK a couple of years ago and loved throwing everything into fundraising; I genuinely really enjoyed it. Based on my personal experience, I think it’s essential to raise awareness of the need for bereavement support for families, in the workplace and in schools.

Climbing Kilimanjaro has always been on my bucket list. I turn thirty next year, so, instead of throwing a party, I decided to take it on!  I am lucky to be doing it with four of my closest friends, we are all raising money for Child Bereavement UK. I have never climbed a mountain and have never really camped either - it will be an adventure I will never forget!

I have had so much support from the Fundraising Team at Child Bereavement UK. The expectation to raise a certain amount of money for a charity is daunting.  Child Bereavement UK provided ideas, resources and encouragement. I know we will hear lots more from them as our expedition looms closer. 

My advice to others thinking of doing a challenge for Child Bereavement UK is go for it! You will receive very good support while you’re fundraising as well as during the challenge itself. They are always on hand to give you ideas and send materials.

My advice to others thinking of doing a challenge for Child Bereavement UK is go for it!   You will receive very good support while you’re fundraising as well as during the challenge itself. They are always on hand to give you ideas and send materials.

The challenge you take on may, at times, seem impossible, but I found that if you’re doing it for a cause close to your heart, you fight that little bit harder.

The challenge you take on may, at times, seem impossible, but I found that if you’re doing it for a cause close to your heart, you fight that little bit harder...